< Home     Series Three   New: Spliced Series Five >

Series Four      

 

A Ringing World in the spring of 2010 contained a roundup of compositions which included some cyclic Bristol Major peals I found of interest. The compositions were (to my taste) very busy, but were based on a true cyclic seven-part plan. Just one or two leads of each part were rung, to avoid cross-part falseness, and multiple course-end or mid-course calls were used to extend the cyclic rollups. I thought it would be interesting to try to achieve something similar myself, but more in the short-course vein - fewer calls, simpler calling, and the music allowed to generate naturally off the front.

My earlier Series 3 cyclic peals had focused on whole courses in a limited number of cyclic parts. For Series 4 I would include four leads (the maximum possible) of every part. Which four leads? Well this was set in stone - by starting at the cyclic course end, you can ring the cyclic change forward and backward - for instance, rounds and reverse rounds. That had to be done.

Initially I looked at ways of linking the 4th lead end of the cyclic part to the next part end as rapidly as possible. It is possible to get linking blocks as short as eight leads, but, as explained more fully below, it turns out there is a ten-lead block which is much neater and more in keeping with the short-course ideals. This forms the 7-part cyclic "c" block from which all the peals below are built.

All we need to do to finish the peal is add a touch of the usual tenors-together loveliness, and it's a wrap. To do this I pioneered a new technique - the "no-duffer search". The discovery of 5056 no.1 in Series 2 had shown up the existence of peals built entirely from "no duffers" courses - those coursing orders generating little-bell runs or back-bell rollups. Given the relatively low number of tenors-together courses needed to complete these cyclic arrangements, I thought it should be possible to pick purely from the no-duffers set. To do this, I set up the SMC32 search so that all other courses were excluded, a fairly laborious task with the current version of the software, but nonetheless immediately effective. This new approach proved to be so fast and powerful that I realised it might be possible to apply it to entire peals - and hence the birth of Series 5.

But for now, enjoy series 4! Overall I'm very pleased with these arrangements - every one a true feast of cyclic splendour.

Series Four:
5024 no.248, 6, 144
5056 no.250, 6, 138
5088 no.652, 6, 146David Pipe, December 2010
5152 no.148, 19, 120Phillip R J Barnes, July 2016
5152 no.242, 14, 128
640052, 21, 152


5024 no.2 / 5056 no.2 Bristol Surprise Major

Composed by Mark B Davies

  2345678  M  B  W  H
  -------------------
  6782345    6c
  4523678     c' 2
  43652    2  5  -  -
  54326       -     2
  23456          2  2
  -------------------

c  = 4.5.5
c' = 4.5

For 5024, call last course M, B, 2H

Contains:
  4 leads from each of the 7 cyclic courses
  48(50)  5678/8765 front or back
  6  6578
 144(138) LB4

When I looked to extend my 'short-course' Bristol ideas to the split-tenors genre, in early 2008, my natural instinct was to work in some cyclic music. Because the cyclic courses are mutually false in Bristol Major, for my Series 3 compositions I concentrated on just two or three whole cyclic courses at a time.

This composition is the first of a new series which takes a different approach. Although the cyclic courses are false between themselves, you can ring the first four leads of each whilst maintaining truth - and this set of leads includes the cyclic part ends both forwards and backwards.

Working in April and May of 2010, I discovered several blocks capable of linking the 4th lead end of a cyclic part to the next cyclic part end, including a block just eight leads long. However, the ten-lead link block called -pppp-pppp- seemed by far the best: with just three calls, it maintains the cyclic runs for the five leads on either side of the cyclic course itself, and generates music off the front and the back in both sections, in a manner very reminiscent of my tenors-together arrangements. It's a lovely, simple, fast-moving block, and matches beautifully with the short-course tenors-together theme.

The four leads of the cyclic part plus the linker gives a block (termed 'c' in the figures above) with calling 4.5.5 and part end 5678234. Repeat this six times and you have a true touch of 3136 changes. This leaves around 1900 changes to go before the peal length, and there are several points where tenors-together courses can be inserted. Generally, however, it seems the best results are ontained with inserts either at the start, or the end - as I have done here.

So, this first compositions starts with the cyclic parts, and finishes with a nice tenors-together block including the five Befores from 35642 beloved of my earlier peals. The rest of the coda flits between little-bell courses and back-bell rollups, avoiding 'duffer' coursing orders in the manner of my 5056 no.1, as well as the later Series 5 peals. There is also a slightly shorter variation which includes two extra 8765s off the front, at the expense of some little-bell music.

I'm pleased with the results - both variations are simple and elegant. The main downside is the limited number of settling courses before the cyclic music starts (just 14 leads to the first cyclic split-tenors). The other compositions in Series 4 address this.


5088 Bristol Surprise Major (no.6)

Composed by Mark B Davies

  2345678  M  B  V  W  H
  ----------------------
  42356                -
  35426             -  -
  65432      F/I    -  -
  43652       5     -  -
  35264    2  -
  5678234  -     -
  2345678       6c
  ----------------------

c = 4.5.5

Contains:
   4 leads from each of the 7 cyclic courses
  52 5678/8765 front or back
   6 6578
 146 LB4

The second Series 4 peal, this uses the same 7-part cyclic calling (the 'c' block) as 5056 and 5024 no.2, but adds the tenors-together courses at the start of the peal. Music counts are slightly higher, at the expense of one 4/I to improve linkage. In fact, I think 52 is the maximum number of back-bell runs available given cross-falseness with the cyclic parts, and the total of 146 LB4s is competitive with the best LB-focused tenors-together arrangements, meaning this arrangement is surprisingly close to optimal.

So, very pleased with this - let me know if you ring it.


5152 Bristol Surprise Major (no.1)

Composed by Mark B Davies

  2345678  M  B  V  W  H
  ----------------------
  25634       -     2  -
  62453    -  4        2
  5678234  -  -  -
  6782345    5c
  5324678     c'    -
  42635    -        S- S-
  34625             -
  23456       -        2
  ----------------------

c  = 4.5.5
c' = 4.5

Contains:
   4 leads from each of the 7 cyclic courses
  48 5678/8765 front or back
  19 6578
 120 LB4

This Series 4 peal once again uses the cyclic 'c' block, but this time splits the tenors-together courses between the start and end of the peal. Music counts are very slightly reduced and there are more 6578s at the expense of little-bell music, but in return you have the benefit of standard courses at the beginning and end of the peal. See also 5152 no.2.


5152 Bristol Surprise Major (no.2)

Composed by Mark B Davies

  2345678  M  B  V  W  H
  ----------------------
  62534       -     S  S
  34625    2        -
  54326       -     -
  25463       -        2
  5678234        -
  6782345    5c
  6234578     c' 4/I   -
  65432    -  3
  23456    -        -  -
  ----------------------

c  = 4.5.5
c' = 4.5

Contains:
   4 leads from each of the 7 cyclic courses
  42 5678/8765 front or back
  14 6578
 128 LB4

The sister of 5152 no.1, this composition reverses the other peal's tenors-together distribution by starting with 65- and 56- dominated courses, and ending with the little-bell fare. As usual, the seven cyclic parts are sandwiched between. Please let me know if you ring it.


6400 Bristol Surprise Major

Composed by Mark B Davies

  2345678  M  B  V  W  H
  ----------------------
  25634       -     2  -
  53246    -  2        -
  62345    -           -
  43652    -  3     -  -
  54326       -        2
  42563       -
  43265    2           -
  42635             -  2
  34625             -
  5678234     2  -
  2345678       6c
  ----------------------

c = 4.5.5

Contains:
   4 leads from each of the 7 cyclic courses
  52 5678/8765 front or back
  21 6578
 152 LB4

I thought it was interesting to answer the question, "how far can you go with non-duffer courses"? This example adds fourteen tenors-together courses to the seven cyclic parts from my 'c' block, with no duffer transitions. In doing so, it brings in the maximum number of 5678/8765 rollups available given falseness against the cyclic block, and a super-high little-bell count. Surely worth the extra ringing time!

 

MBD July 2010